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The Classical Musician’s Paradigm Shift

The future attendance that we do not want in our concert hallsTMD continues its series on emerging artists in classical music today with a rethinking of the the problem and the solution. We know that audiences are declining, and so classical music organizations respond with innovative presentations, non-traditional performances, and clever marketing approaches. While well intentioned, such efforts miss the real problem in the opinion of Annie Gordon. They are nice, perhaps, but only “band-aids” to solving the issue of declining audiences.

Gordon argues that the very mindset of classical musicians must change first before any substantial change is possible with audience trends. “As musicians, we are preventing our own art from flourishing because we do not value with equal intensity our roles as music educators and mentors,” Gordon argues.

Join us for a consideration of how one defines the role of “musician” in this article from The Muse Dialogue, “The Classical Musician’s Paradigm Shift” (click to read full article).

2 Comments Post a comment
  1. “As musicians, we are preventing our own art from flourishing because we do not value with equal intensity our roles as music educators and mentors,” Gordon argues.

    This is a powerful statement– and one I agree with intensely. But, I’d like to take it one step further, we are not just educators and mentors, we are also social creatures. We must relate to our audiences.

    The relationship between audience and performer is what I’m all about. My focus is to help bridge that connection. Thanks for writing this and helping to get the word out that if we want change in the arts, we have to be the change. Keep up the good work!

    -JMB

    2013
  2. Richard St. John #

    Annie Gordon’s insights seem right on track to me, especially:

    . I propose that every musician out there, particularly those who define themselves as performers, recast themselves as performers and educators.

    . And: The key is creating a contagious atmosphere of love and respect for music.

    It’s discouraging, though, that you’re the only student in the Music in Urban Schools class. Keep it up! (I know that many others are, quietly, laboring in the fields with you to connect more meaningfully with audiences.and beyond existing audiences.)

    Best wishes, — Rick

    Richard St. John

    2013

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